Posted in Park review, Southwestern Ohio

Edge of Appalachia: Buzzardroost Rock Trail

Buzzardroost Rock Trail offers a truly stunning vista perched 500 feet above the Ohio Brush Creek valley. The trail is part of the 16,000-acre Edge of Appalachia Preserve in Adams County. Located just south of Ohio SR-125, the trail stretches 2.2 miles one-way along ridgelines from the parking lot to the observation area, making for a 4.4 mile hike.

Deb in the observation area checking out the view
Deb in the observation area checking out the view





A sign at a gravel turn-off on the south side of SR-125 identifies the parking area and trail-head for Buzzardroost Trail. About a quarter mile down the gravel road is a cement parking area and an information kiosk about the trail. The trailhead is near a large sign across the gravel driveway from the parking area.

Sign on Ohio-125 near entrance for parking area
Sign on Ohio-125 near entrance for parking area
Mailbox near preserve driveway
Deb at parking lot
Deb at parking lot
Preserve sign and trailhead
Preserve sign and trailhead

The trail traverses a small hill, crosses a small bridge, and enters the woods. A sign-in kiosk for visitors is located at the bridge. The trail is marked with red blazes. It proceeds through forest for about a mile crossing bridges over several small streams which feature small seasonal waterfalls.

Near the beginning of the trail
Near the beginning of the trail
Deb on footbridge
Deb on footbridge
Woodland trail

It then emerges into an open prairie area for a short while, ascends a hill and re-enters the forest. After another mile, it emerges on top of a Peebles dolomite rock outcropping overlooking Ohio Brush Creek. An observation area features benches and a spectacular view.

Large opening to the side of the trail
Large opening to the side of the trail
Landslide
Trail through an opening
Trail through an opening
Trail on a slope
Ridgeline
Ridgeline
Looking off to the side of the trail past the edge of the ridgeline
Approaching the observation deck
Approaching the observation deck
Nearing small bridge that joins the trail and the bedrock slab on which the observation deck is based

We arrived about lunch time on a clear sunny day. We stayed a while and ate our trail lunch while enjoying the view. We visited in late May, but we’ve been told that the vista from the observation area is superb for viewing fall color.

Bob enjoying lunch on the observation deck
Vista from the observation deck
Vista from the observation deck
Vista from the observation deck
Vista from the observation deck
Vista from the observation deck
Vista from the observation deck
Panorama of the vista from the observation deck

There is a sign at the observation deck which shows the location of the observation deck relative to its surroundings. It also makes clear that this would be a wonderful place to view fall color.

Sign posted at the observation deck. The photo embedded toward the bottom of the sign shows the position of the observation deck on the hillside. Also note the beautiful, fall color.

Because we were there in the May, a number of spring wildflowers were blooming, some of which we already published in the post, Spring Wildflowers 2015. Some additional wildflowers follow.

Hoary puccoon (Lithospermum canescens)
Hoary puccoon (Lithospermum canescens)
Eastern Waterleaf (Hydrophyllum virginianum)
Eastern Waterleaf (Hydrophyllum virginianum)
Deb taking a macro photograph of a wildflower

We also saw a number of butterflies and moths.

Zebra Swallowtail butterfly (Eurytides marcellus)
Zebra Swallowtail butterfly (Eurytides marcellus)
Little Wood-satyr butterfly (Megisto cymela)
Little Wood-satyr butterfly (Megisto cymela)
Pale Beauty (Campaea perlata)
Pale Beauty (Campaea perlata)

We don’t normally post photos of flies, but this one was shiney. 🙂

Golden-backed snipe fly (Chrysopilus thoracicus)
Golden-backed snipe fly (Chrysopilus thoracicus)

Deb was also excited to see the following toad because almost every single toad we see is an Eastern American Toad (Bufo americanus americanus). The one below is a Fowler’s toad. One way to tell the species apart is to count the number of warts in various dark spots. If you find dark spots with more than two warts, it’s a Fowler’s toad; otherwise, it’s an Eastern American toad.

Fowler’s Toad (Bufo fowleri)
Fowler’s Toad (Bufo fowleri)
Additional information




Location
  • Address: 16300 OH-125, West Union, OH 45693 (near town of Lynx)
  • GPS Coordinates: 38.770605, -83.425814
  • Google Maps: View on map or get directions

If you’d like to see a GPS trace of our hike on the Buzzardroost Rock Trail, check in out on Google Maps.

More on the Edge of Appalachia

© Deborah Platt, Robert Platt and TrekOhio.com 2012 to 2017


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