Ohio’s 15 species of frogs and toads at a glance

An article entitled, Ohio’s Frog and Toad Species, states that there are 15 species in our state. To help me to learn to identify these species, I wanted to see photos of all 15 on one page. I selected a representative photo for each species from Flickr.

Keep in mind that a single species may vary a lot in color. Below each photo, I note the range of colors that are possible for that species.

Toads

The “True” Toads

Eastern American Toad (Bufo americanus americanus)

Eastern American Toad
Eastern American Toad;
Photographed by me at Inniswood Metro Park

The Eastern American toad does vary in color. It may be reddish, gray, or tan.

Fowler’s Toad (Bufo fowleri)

Photo courtesy pondhawk, license: CC BY 2.0

Fowler toad
Fowler’s Toad (Bufo fowleri)

The Fowler’s toad may be brown, tan, gray, or light green. The dark spots on the back of the Fowler’s toad have three or more “warts” while the dark spots, if present on the American toad, have only one or two “warts.” Another distinction is that the bumps on the leg of the American Toad tend to be more pronounced than those of the Fowler’s toad.

The Spadefoot Toads

Eastern Spadefoot (Scaphiopus holbrookii)

Scaphiopus holbrookii: Eastern Spadefoot by Todd W Pierson, on Flickr
Eastern Spadefoot Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License  by  Todd W Pierson 

There are two yellow lines on the Eastern Spadefoot’s back. It is the only frog/toad on this page whose pupils are vertical.

Frogs

The “True” Frogs

American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)

American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)
American Bullfrog;
Photographed by me at Inniswood Metro Park
December bullfrog
American Bullfrog;
Photographed by me in my driveway

The American bullfrog’s back may be green or brown.

Northern Green Frog (Rana clamitans melanota)

Northern green frog  (Rana clamitans melanota)
Northern Green Frog;
Photographed by me at Inniswood Metro Park

The back of the Northern Green Frog may be green or brownish green. It may or may not have noticeable spots. When it doesn’t seem to have spots, you can still distinguish it from the American Bullfrog because the Northern Green Frog has a ridge going down each side of its back, while the American Bullfrog does not.

Pickerel Frog (Rana palustris)

Pickerel Frog by cm195902, on Flickr
Pickerel Frog Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License  by  cm195902 

The Pickerel Frog may be tan, light brown, or olive-green. Note that the spots between the folds on the frog’s back have a squarish quality.

Northern Leopard Frog (Rana pipiens pipiens)

Leopard Frog Northern Leopard Frog, photographed by me at Tinker’s Creek State Nature Preserve.

The Northern Leopard Frog may be tan, light brown, or olive-green. Note that the spots have a light-colored rim.

Southern Leopard Frog (Rana sphenocephala utricularius)

Southern Leopard Frog by GA-Kayaker, on Flickr
Southern Leopard Frog Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License  by  GA-Kayaker 

The Southern Leopard Frog may be green or brown. Unlike the Northern Leopard Frog, the spots of the Southern Leopard Frog don’t have a light border.

Wood Frog (Rana sylvatica)

Frogs mating
Photographed by me at Dawes Arboretum; these frogs are both wood frogs,
so this gives you some idea of the variation in color that’s possible.

Wood frogs are typically dark brown or tan, but occasionally individuals have been discovered that are a reddish color, or even pink.

The Tree Frogs

Blanchard’s Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans blanchardi)

Blanchard’s Cricket Frog (Acris crepitan by GregTheBusker, on Flickr
Blanchard’s Cricket Frog Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License  by  GregTheBusker 

The Blanchard’s Cricket Frog may be brown, gray or olive-green.

Cope’s gray tree frogs (Hyla chrysoscelis)

029 by GO Photo2010, on Flickr
Cope’s gray tree frogs Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License  by  GO Photo2010 

The Cope’s gray tree frog (above) and the Eastern gray tree frog (below) are supposed to look virtually identical, but they are very different genetically. You might be saying to yourself, “Hey, they don’t look so very identical to me.” But as mentioned at the top of this post, this is part of the normal variability in color that occurs in many of these species. Typically these two species are gray, but they can change to green.

Eastern Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor)

Hyla versicolor: Eastern Gray Treefrog by Todd W Pierson, on Flickr
Eastern Gray Treefrog Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License  by  Todd W Pierson 

Mountain Chorus Frog (Pseudacris brachyphona)

Pseudacris brachyphona: Mountain Chorus Frog
Mountain Chorus Frog (Pseudacris brachyphona); published by Todd Pierson at Flickr

The Mountain Chorus Frog may be light brown or olive-green.

Northern Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer crucifer)

Pseudacris crucifer: Spring Peeper by Todd W Pierson, on Flickr
Northern Spring Peeper Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License  by  Todd W Pierson 

The back of the Northern Spring Peeper is some combination of yellow, brown, tan, reddish, or olive-green.

Western Chorus Frog (Pseudacris triseriata triseriata)

Western Chorus Frog by Benimoto, on Flickr
Western Chorus Frog Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License  by  Benimoto 

The Western Chorus Frog’s back is brown, gray, tan or olive-green.

© Deborah Platt, Robert Platt and TrekOhio.com 2012
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8 Responses to Ohio’s 15 species of frogs and toads at a glance

  1. RUTH HOPKINS says:

    I FOUND A TOAD RESEMBLING THE FOWLER OR EASTERN TOAD IN MY GARAGE AMOUNG SOME WET CARDBOARD BOXES ON THE FLOOR, BUT THE TOAD I FOUND HAD A DEFINITE BLUE COLOR MIXED IN WITH THE DARK BROWN OF IT’S BACK. ANY SUGGESTION AS TO THE IDENTITY? THANKS

    • Deb Platt says:

      Ruth, I don’t believe any of the toads in our state have a blue pigment. I am wondering if the blue color was transferred onto the toad from something it was crawling through. For instance, if you put down one of those plastic grocery bags on a wet counter, the pigment from the writing on the bag will transfer from the bag to the counter. So maybe there was some blue printing on the cardboard boxes, and the toad crawled through it. Or maybe there was some mold on the boxes (mold can have a bluish cast).

      If that’s not the case, I confess that you’ve totally stumped me.

  2. Pingback: Wood frog (Rana sylvatica) | College Green Magazine – Eco-news From The Ground Up

  3. Thanks for the comments distinguishing one from the other…very helpful!

  4. Kari Moon says:

    We just caught a released a HUGE frog in our pond. Obviously it’s so big that you assume it’s a bullfrog, but the bottom of the frog is throwing us off. it has a cool white and brown squiggly line action going on, very distinct. I’d love to e-mail someone a picture to show them this thing and just confirm it’s a bullfrog. The only other thing close that it looks like is the Northern Green Frog but it doesn’t have the ridges.

  5. I found a small frog with a green back and brownish tan belly. Could it be a western chorus frog? I live in northern madison, ohio if that’s any help.

    • Deb Platt says:

      Almost every frog and toad species shows a lot of variation in color. I am tempted to think that the frog that you saw may have been the Northern Green Frog. Did it have any ridges on its back? Is there a picture of it online anywhere that would be visible to me like Flickr? Instagram?

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